Stars in Nutrition & Cancer Lecture Series

Stars in Nutrition & Cancer.This lecture series features extraordinary contributors in the field of cancer and nutrition research. Speakers highlight the important role that nutrition plays in modifying cancer development. Past lectures can be viewed on the NIH VideoCast website.

All Stars in Nutrition and Cancer lectures are approved by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) for one continuing professional education (CPE) credit for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs). RDNs can contact trujille@mail.nih.gov to receive a CPE certificate.

Upcoming Lecture

Michael Pollak, MD, of McGill University, will present the next Stars in Nutrition & Cancer lecture on March 17, 2020, entitled “Energy Balance and Neoplasia: Do Cancers Care if Their Host is Hungry?”

Past Lectures

Lifestyle and Breast Cancer: Addition by Subtraction and the Value of Randomized Clinical Trials

Speaker

Rowan T. Chlebowski, MD, PhD
Chief, Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology
Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
Senior Investigator
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA
Torrance, CA

View the NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 00:55:18

Date: October 16, 2019
Time: 2:00 – 3:00pm
Location: Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10, NIH Main Campus

Meeting Objectives

  • To outline the role of the National Institutes of Health in the development of the lifestyle and breast cancer area; and
  • To defend the value of full-scale randomized trials on public health.
Breaking the Obesity-Cancer Link: New Targets and Strategies

Speaker

Stephen D. Hursting, PhD, MPH
Professor, Department of Nutrition and Nutrition Research Institute
Member, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC

View the NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:07:49

Date: March 12, 2019
Time: 2:00 – 3:00pm
Location: Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10, NIH Main Campus

Meeting Objectives

  • To understand the current status of research on the relationships between obesity and cancer;
  • To explore the established and emerging mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link;
  • To discuss the current status of research on the anticancer effects and underlying mechanisms of weight loss and related interventions, including calorie restriction, fasting, fasting-mimicking diets, ketogenic diets, bariatric surgery, and pharmacologic approaches; and
  • To describe approaches to enhance translational progress in obesity, energy balance and cancer research by better integration of preclinical and human research to decrease the burden of obesity on cancer in humans.

This lecture is approved by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) for 1 Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs). RDNs, contact trujille@mail.nih.gov for CPE certificate.

Weight Control and Exercise for Breast Cancer Prevention

Anne McTiernan, MD, PhD
Research Professor
University of Washington Schools of Medicine and Public Health
Full Faculty Member
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Seattle, WA

View the NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 00:56:59

Date: October 3, 2018
Time: 2:00 – 3:00 PM
Location: Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10, NIH Main Campus

Meeting Objectives

  • To understand the associations between weight and exercise in breast cancer risk;
  • To comprehend the effects of weight loss and exercise on biomarkers of breast cancer risk; and
  • To recognize the needs for additional research on weight, exercise, and breast cancer prevention.
Diet and Cancer Prevention: Chewing on the Human Complexities

Speaker

Johanna W. Lampe, PhD, RD
Research Professor
University of Washington
Full Member and Associate Division Director
Cancer Prevention Program
Public Health Sciences Division
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Seattle, WA

View the NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 00:57:45

Date: March 13, 2018
Time: 2:00 – 3:00pm
Location: Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10, NIH Main Campus

Meeting Objectives

  • To outline mechanisms by which dietary constituents in plant foods lower cancer risk;
  • To describe the application of controlled feeding studies in humans to cancer prevention research; and
  • To describe the impact of host and microbial genotypes on response to diet and implications for prevention.
The Innate Immune Response to Natural Products and to Eustress

Star Speaker

Michael Caligiuri, MD
Director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center
The Ohio State University
President of the American Association for Cancer Research

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 00:35:15

Date: Monday, November 13th
Time: 2pm
Location: Lipsett Amphitheater, NIH Main Campus

Meeting Objectives

  • To understand normal natural killer (NK) cell subsets and their functions
  • To assess the mechanism of the NK response to select natural products
  • To understand the anti-cancer immune effect of eustress
Aflatoxin: An Old Carcinogen Teaches Us New Tricks

Star Speaker

John D. Groopman, PhD
Anna M. Baetjer Professor of Environmental Health Sciences
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Associate Director for Population Sciences
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Baltimore, MD

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 00:55:16

Date

March 21, 2017

Time

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Learn about the historic role that the dietary carcinogen aflatoxin has played in human liver cancer;
  • Outline how mechanistic studies of aflatoxin has helped establish a paradigm for chemoprevention in high risk populations; and
  • Project the emerging role of this agent in fatty liver disease and emerging data on liver cancer in Central America.
Nutrient Sensing by the mTOR Pathway

Star Speaker

David M. Sabatini, MD, PhD
Member, Whitehead Institute
Professor of Biology, MIT
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Senior Associate Member, Broad Institute
Member, Koch Institute
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, MA

NIH VideoCast not available.

Date

December 5, 2016

Time

10:00 am - 11:00 am

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the role of nutrient sensing in growth control; and
  • Comprehend the role of subcellular compartmentalization in mTOR signaling
Food-Based Cancer Prevention Strategies: Is There a Future for Human Studies?

Star Speaker

Steven K. Clinton, MD, PhD
John B. and Jane T. McCoy Chair in Cancer Research
The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center
Professor, Division of Medical Oncology
The Ohio State University School of Medicine
Columbus, OH

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:08:25

Date

March 15, 2016

Time

2:00 - 3:00 pm

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10, NIH Main Campus

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast strategies for cancer prevention based upon nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns;
  • Appreciate the critical steps in food processing and technology involved in the development of novel food products for cancer prevention; and
  • Integrate food-based strategies into the cancer prevention effort, defining the optimal agent, the biomarkers, and the cohort.
Energy Hormesis and Your Health: A Different View of Energetics and Cancer

Star Speaker

Henry Thompson, PhD
Director of the Cancer Prevention Laboratory
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:03:46

Date

November 16, 2015

Time

2:00 – 3:00 pm

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10
NIH Main Campus

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • To explore the concept of energy hormesis and health with a specific focus on breast cancer;
  • To evaluate the impact of inherent versus induced aerobic capacity on cancer risk, and energy stress pharmacology; and
  • To assess energy restriction feasibility, energy restriction mechanisms, energy availability and stress in regards to cancer risk.
Lifestyle and Breast Cancer

Star Speaker

Pamela Goodwin, MD, MSc, FRCP
Senior Investigator
Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute
Marvelle Koffler Chair in Breast Research
Professor of Medicine
University of Toronto
Mount Sinai Hospital
Toronto, Ontario

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:05:16

Date

March 03, 2015

Time

2:00 – 3:00 pm

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10
NIH Main Campus

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • To review evidence linking lifestyle (obesity, diet, exercise) to breast cancer outcomes; and
  • To discuss potential biologic mechanisms for lifestyle effects on breast cancer.
Childhood and Adolescent Nutrition and Growth Drive Breast Cancer Risk: Untapped Opportunities for Prevention

Star Speaker

Graham Colditz, MD, DrPH

Niess-Gain Professor of Surgery, Professor of Medicine
Associate Director Prevention and Control
Chief, Division of Public Health Sciences
Department of Surgery
Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center
Washington University School of Medicine
St Louis, MO

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:15:38

Date

October 06, 2014

Time

3:00 – 4:00 pm EDT
3:00 pm Opening Remarks
3:15 pm Lecture and Discussion

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify childhood growth as predictors of lifelong risk;
  • Identify components of pre-menarcheal diet that modify breast cancer risk;
  • Identify gaps in understanding of nutrition before first pregnancy and breast cancer risk; and
  • Understand breast cancer risk accumulation in context of breast development and maturation.

This activity will be of interest to anyone with an interest in nutrition and cancer prevention.

Links Between Metabolism and Cancer

Star Speaker

Chi Van Dang, MD, PhD
John H. Glick Professor of Medicine
Director, Abramson Cancer Center and Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Philadelphia, PA

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 00:52:00

Date

March 18, 2014

Time

1:00 - 2:00 pm
1:00 pm Opening Remarks
1:15 pm Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • To understand organismal metabolism and cancer;
  • To understand aspects of calories and cancer from a molecular perspective; and
  • To understand circadian rhythm, cancer, and cancer cell metabolism.
Micronutrients and Cancer Prevention: A Complex World

Star Speaker

Susan Taylor Mayne, PhD
Professor and Department Chair
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology
Yale Schools of Public Health and Medicine
New Haven, CT

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:05:32

Date

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Time

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
2:00 pm Opening Remarks
2:15 pm Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To describe the scientific basis for current recommendations involving micronutrients for cancer prevention;
  • To apply biochemical and physiological principles to improve the quality of research on micronutrients in cancer prevention; and
  • To be able to more critically evaluate the literature on micronutrients in cancer prevention.
Can We Win the War Against Cancer by Prevention?

Star Speaker

Zigang Dong, MD, PhD
Hormel-Knowlton Professor
McKnight Presidential Professor in Cancer Prevention
Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology
The Hormel Institute
University of Minnesota
Austin, MN

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:12:41

Date

Monday, November 05, 2012

Time

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
2:00 pm Opening Remarks
2:15 pm Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To understand why cancer is still a major public health concern in the world;
  • To comprehend why prevention is critical to lowering the incidence of cancer worldwide; and
  • To recognize why nutritional foods are important for cancer prevention.
Novel Omega-3 Mediators & Mechanisms in the Resolution of Inflammation: What can they tell us about Preventative and Therapeutic Approaches?

Star Speaker

Charles N. Serhan, PhD
Director, Center for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion Injury
Brigham and Women's Hospital
The Simon Gelman Professor of Anesthesia (Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology)
Professor of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity
Harvard University
Boston, MA

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:06:33

Date

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Time

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
2:00 pm Opening Remarks
2:15 pm Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • Define the functional differences between anti-inflammation versus pro-resolution and the cell types involved;
  • Define the anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators;
  • Review the biosynthesis and omega-3 precursors (EPA and DHA) of the resolvins, protectins and maresins (E-series vs. D-series resolvins) and their actions;
  • Define the resolution indices: what enhances resolution and the drugs that are resolution toxic; and
  • What are the key cellular targets of the resolvins and mechanism(s) (e.g. receptors, miR, etc.) that define resolving autacoids in animal inflammatory diseases.
Chemoprevention Using Natural Dietary Components to Target Cancer Stem Cells

Star Speaker

Max S. Wicha, MD
Distinguished Professor of Oncology
Director, Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:01:28

Date

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Time

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
3:00 Opening Remarks
3:15 Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To understand the role of stem cells in breast carcinogenesis;
  • To gain knowledge of the pathways that isolate normal and malignant stem cells; and
  • To understand how these stem cell regulating pathways may be regulated by dietary components, including curcumin and sulforaphane.
False Positives, False Negatives, and Small Effects: Genome, Exposome, and Nutrition

Star Speaker

John Ioannidis, MD, DSc
CF Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention
Professor of Medicine and Director
Stanford Prevention Research Center
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:07:55

Date

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Time

3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
3:00 Opening Remarks
3:15 Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To present theoretical arguments regarding the relative presence of false positive and false negative associations in epidemiological investigation;
  • To discuss the factors that affect the ratio of false positives to false negatives;
  • To present empirical evidence on the ratio of false positives to false positives and lessons from – omics agnostic research as they may apply to non-genomic exposures, such as nutrition; and
  • To present empirical evidence on the small magnitude of epidemiological associations and the implications for discovery and application of new epidemiological knowledge.
Soy and Cancer: Wish You Were Young Again

Star Speaker

Stephen Barnes, PhD
Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
University of Alabama Birmingham
Birmingham, AL

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:19:59

Date

Monday, October 04, 2010

Time

3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
3:00 Opening Remarks
3:15 Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To appreciate the composition of soy and its isoflavones in various food forms;
  • To understand the importance of diet in models of cancer; and
  • To gain a mechanistic understanding of epigenetic effects caused by soy.
The Human Microbiome-Host Metabolic Axis in Health and Disease

Star Speaker

Jeremy Nicholson, PhD
Chair, Biological Chemistry
Imperial College London
London, UK

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:22:07

Date

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Time

3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
3:00 Opening Remarks
3:15 Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To explore gene-environment interactions in man and animals;
  • To learn about molecular epidemiology of human disease risk factors and metabolic biomarker discovery;
  • To discover measuring and modeling profiles and microbial mammalian co-metabolism; and
  • To comprehend personalized healthcare and drug-bug interactions.
Epigenetics, Nutrition and Disease Susceptibility

Star Speaker

Randy Jirtle, PhD
Director of the Epigenetics and Imprinting Laboratory
Duke University
Raleigh, NC

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:13:15

Date

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Time

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Building 10, Lipsett Amphitheater

1:00 pm Opening Remarks & Stars Lecture
2:00 pm Meet the Star

Building 10, Room 4-3330

2:15 pm Frontiers in Epigenetics and Cancer Prevention Research
3:30 pm Training Opportunities in Epigenetics
4:30 pm Wrap-Up

Location

Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To learn about epigenetics;
  • To learn about genetic imprinting; and
  • To learn about the role that epigenetics and imprinting play in the etiology of human health and disease.

Event is free and open to the public, registration is not required.

Event is pre-approved by the CDR for 2 credits for Registered Dietitians.

Nanonutrition Frontiers: Lessons Learned from Imaging and Therapy

Star Speaker

Martin Philbert, PhD
Professor of Toxicology
Senior Associate Dean for Research
Director Center for Risk Science and Communication
The University of Michigan School of Public Health
Ann Arbor, MI

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:07:08

Date

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Time

3:00 pm- 5:00 pm
3:00 Opening Remarks
3:15 Lecture and Discussion

Location

Masur Auditorium
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To present configuration of polymer nanosensors, imaging nano-agents and photodynamic nanoparticles;
  • To show capabilities of sensors, imaging and photodynamic nanoparticles;
  • To present data on AD(M)E of polymer nanoparticles; and
  • To present a priori considerations of toxicity in the design of useful therapeutic/imaging nanoparticle agents.
A Family Based Approach to Breast Cancer Prevention

Star Speaker

Olufunmilayo Olopade, MD
Walter L. Palmer Distinguished Service Professor in Medicine and Human Genetics
Director, Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program
Director, Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:05:06

Date

Wednesday, October 01, 2008

Time

3:00 pm- 5:00 pm
3:00 Opening Remarks by Dr. John Niederhuber, Director, NCI
3:15 Lecture and Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To understand familial aspects of breast cancer;
  • To understand the contribution of high risk alleles and low penetrant genes;
  • To emphasize primary prevention strategies for familial breast cancer; and
  • To explore interventions for breast cancer prevention, including lifestyle and nutritional approaches.
Nutrition and Cancer: From Genotype to Phenotype

Star Speaker

Martin Wiseman, MD
Medical and Scientific Adviser
World Cancer Research Fund International
Visiting Professor of Human Nutrition
University of Southhampton
United Kingdom

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:07:22

Date

Tuesday, March 18, 2008

Time

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • To emphasize the role of nutrition as well as genes in determining phenotype;
  • To demonstrate the potential for early life events to induce phenotype, and for maternal exposures before and during pregnancy to influence phenotype in the offspring;
  • To understand how these mechanisms might interact to influence cancer processes.
Genetic and Nutritional Modulation of Intestinal Tumorigenesis

Star Speaker

Leonard Augenlicht, PhD
Albert Einstein Cancer Center
Montefiore Medical Center
Bronx, NY

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:01:41

Date

Thursday, October 04, 2007

Time

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Dietary Management of Pro-Inflammatory States: A Nutrigenomic Model

Star Speaker

Peter J. Gillies, PhD
Senior Research Fellow
Central Research & Development
E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Company
Newark, DE

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:05:57

Date

Thursday, March 15, 2007

Time

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the contributions of diet, including omega-3 fatty acids to various inflammatory conditions; and
  • Apply a nutrigenomic approach to the development of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched diets for the dietary management of pro-inflammatory states, including cancer.
Nutritional and Molecular Biomarkers in Diet and Cancer Epidemiology

Star Speaker

Sheila Bingham, PhD
Director, Medical Research Council Centre for Nutrition in Cancer Prevention and Survival
Dept. of Public Health and Primary Care
University of Cambridge
Head, Diet and Cancer Group
Medical Research Council Dunn Human Nutrition Unit
Cambridge, UK

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:05:01

Date

Monday, October 23, 2006

Time

3:00 pm – Opening Remarks
3:15 pm – Lecture & Discussion
4:15 pm – Reception

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus
Bethesda, MD

Objectives

  • Understand the development of biomarkers in nutritional epidemiology; and
  • Identify the applications and findings from cohort studies using biomarkers in diet and cancer.
Mitochondrial Decay Contributes to Aging and Degenerative Diseases: The Role of Micronutrients

Star Speaker

Bruce Ames, PhD
Professor, Department of Molecular & Cell Biology
University of California Berkeley
Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute
Oakland, CA

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:06:31

Date

Monday, March 27, 2006

Time

3:30-3:45 pm – Opening Remarks
3:45-4:45 pm – Lecture & Discussion
4:45-5:30 pm – Reception

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus

Overall Series Objectives

  • Identify the newest and most significant advances in basic nutrition science and how they relate to cancer; and
  • Assess how nutritional science research can contribute to NCI's goal of eliminating the cancer burden by the year 2015.

Individual Meeting Objectives

  • Understand how disease can be prevented by turning up metabolism; and
  • Determine the optimal level of vitamins and minerals for keeping DNA damage and mitochondrial decay to a minimum.
Mechanisms Leading to the Formation of Human Malignancies

Star Speaker

Robert Weinberg, PhD
Member, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research
Daniel K. Ludwig and American Cancer Society Research Professor of Molecular Biology
Department of Biology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, MA

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:11:03

Date

Wednesday, September 28, 2005

Time

9:00-9:15 am – Opening Remarks
9:15-10:15 am – Lecture & Discussion
10:15-11:00 am – Reception

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to understand:

  • Identify the newest and most significant advances in basic nutrition science and how they relate to cancer;
  • Assess how nutritional science research can contribute to NCI's goal of eliminating the cancer burden by the year 2015;
  • Understand the genetic rules that govern the formation of primary tumors;
  • Appreciate how primary tumors become invasive and metastatic; and
  • Comprehend how cancer cells recruit normal cells into tumor masses.
Protecting Against Cancer: Edible Plants, Genes, and Enzymes

Star Speaker

Paul Talay, MD
Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Baltimore, MD

View NIH VideoCast
Runtime: 01:10:57

Date

March 21, 2005

Time

3:00 pm – Opening Remarks
3:15 pm – Lecture & Discussion
4:15 pm – Reception

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus

Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the mechanisms by which phytochemicals, genes, and enzymes are regulated by plant chemicals in cancer prevention.
  • Recognize sulforaphane and other bioactive food components as inducers of protective enzyme activity to prevent cancer.
Nuclear Receptors and the Complex Journey to Obesity

Star Speaker

Ron M. Evans, PhD
Gene Expression Laboratory
Salk Institute
La Jolla, CA

No NIH VideoCast available.

Date

September 20, 2004

Time

4:00-4:15 pm – Introduction (Dr. Zerhouni)
4:15-5:15 pm – Lecture
5:15-6:00 pm – Discussion

Location

Lipsett Amphitheater
Building 10
NIH Main Campus

Objectives

  • To understand the newest and most significant advances in the problems arising from obesity and how they relate to cancer.
  • To explore how key regulators of energy balance may control diverse aspects of tumor growth.

Planning Committee

Tanya Agurs-Collins, PhD, RDN
Program Director
Health Behaviors Research Branch
Behavioral Research Program
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences
National Cancer Institute, NIH

Cindy Davis, PhD
Director of Grants and Extramural Activities
Office of Dietary Supplements
National Institutes of Health

Young Kim, PhD
Program Director
Nutritional Science Research Group
Division of Cancer Prevention
National Cancer Institute, NIH

Mark Miller, PhD
Program Director
Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group
Division of Cancer Prevention
National Cancer Institute, NIH

Lori Minasian, MD, FACP
Deputy Director
Division of Cancer Prevention
National Cancer Institute, NIH

Linda Nebeling, PhD, MPH, RDN, FAND
Deputy Associate Director
Behavior Research Program
Division of Cancer Control and Population Science
National Cancer Institute, NIH

Harold Seifried, PhD, DABT
Chief, Nutritional Science Research Group
Division of Cancer Prevention
National Cancer Institute, NIH

Elaine Trujillo, MS, RDN
Nutritionist
Nutritional Science Research Group
Division of Cancer Prevention
National Cancer Institute, NIH

Jeffrey White, MD
Director
Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis
National Cancer Institute, NIH