Publications

Lung cancer inhibitory effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate is dependent on its presence in a complex mixture (polyphenon E).

Author(s): Fu H,  He J,  Mei F,  Zhang Q,  Hara Y,  Ryota S,  Lubet RA,  Chen R,  Chen DR,  You M

Journal: Cancer Prev Res (Phila)

Date: 2009 Jun

Major Program(s) or Research Group(s): CADRG

PubMed ID: 19470785

PMC ID: not available

Abstract: Green tea has been shown to exhibit cancer-preventive activities in preclinical studies. However, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) alone was shown to be ineffective in preventing lung tumorigenesis in mice by aerosol administration. In this study, Polyphenon E and Polyphenon E without EGCG were administered by aerosol delivery to A/J mice 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and continuing daily throughout the remainder of the study (20 weeks). An improved aerosol delivery system with a custom-built atomizer, an efficient solvent remove system, and a nose-only exposure chamber was used to provide aerosols with stable size distribution. There were no significant differences in the size distributions of Polyphenon E and Polyphenon E without EGCG. With a relatively low dose level (4.19 mg/kg), Polyphenon E decreased tumor multiplicity by 53%, whereas Polyphenon E without EGCG at the same dose failed to inhibit lung carcinogenesis. These results indicate that aerosol administration can be an effective approach in chemoprevention study, and aerosolized Polyphenon E can significantly inhibit pulmonary adenoma formation and growth in A/J mice. Furthermore, in aerosolized form, EGCG, which is thought to be the most active component of Polyphenon E, has to be present with other tea catechins to show chemopreventive activity on lung tumorigenesis.